University of Baltimore

University of Baltimore

University of Baltimore

News

Student Awareness of Henrietta Lacks Story Forms Basis for Sophomore Seminar

An opening reception for an extensive University of Baltimore student-based research project on the life of Henrietta Lacks—a black Baltimore woman whose cells were taken without consent in the 1950s and later used by research universities and for-profit pharmaceutical companies to develop vaccines—will be held in the UB Student Center Gallery on Monday, Dec. 1 from 2 to 4 p.m. The event, which will feature papers and other scholarship on Lacks, is free and open to the public. The gallery is located on the top floor of the center, at 21 W. Mt. Royal Ave.

The students in UB's Sophomore Seminar based much of their work on the book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. They engaged in research relevant to themes observed in the book while exploring academic objectives associated with the course.

The Sophomore Seminar is designed to enhance students' academic progress toward an undergraduate major by developing their critical thinking skills and enabling them to explore and make connections across their academic work, personal aspirations and professional goals.

Darien Ripple, experiential learning program manager in the Office of Academic Innovation, said the students' studies of and responses to the Lacks case are inspiring.

"In talking with students, they seem to connect with the book because it mentions places that they are familiar and hits on topics like race and social injustice which are more than relevant," Ripple said.

Read the Office of Academic Innovation blog.

The University of Baltimore is a member of the University System of Maryland and comprises the College of Public Affairs, the Merrick School of Business, the UB School of Law and the Yale Gordon College of Arts and Sciences.

 

University of Baltimore

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Law Professor: How Can Maryland Immigrants Benefit from Reform?

In an op-ed in The Baltimore Sun, Elizabeth Keyes, director of the Immigrant Rights Clinic at the University of Baltimore School of Law, writes that President Obama's announcement about reforms on immigration policy are an opportunity to improve the lives of many immigrants living in Maryland.

"The key question for me ... is how to best reach, educate and serve those immigrants in Maryland who may be able to benefit from Mr. Obama's announcement—and how to help them avoid victimization," Keyes writes.

Read the op-ed.

Learn more about Prof. Keyes and the Immigrant Rights Clinic.

 

 

University of Baltimore

News

President Schmoke Comments on His Recent Trip to Cuba

In an op-ed in The Baltimore Sun, University of Baltimore President Kurt Schmoke discusses his recent trip to Cuba, and outlines an effort to normalize relations between the United States and the island nation.

"What I learned was that, on a people-to-people basis, the citizens of Cuba and the United States desire close ties and normal business relations, but the governments of our two countries remain stuck in Cold War-era political battles," Schmoke writes. "Although both Cuban and American doctors are in West Africa fighting the Ebola crisis, such cooperation remains the exception rather than the rule."

Read the op-ed.

Learn more about UB President Kurt L. Schmoke.

University of Baltimore

News

Criminal Justice Professor: Use Caution When Considering Societal Impact of Serial Murderers

Speaking on HuffPost Live, University of Baltimore Criminal Justice Professor Jeffrey Ian Ross says it's important for the public to be skeptical when the media make news about serial killers—for example, this week's coverage of Charles Manson's plans to get married.

"You have to be careful" about the various perspectives throughout society when discussing beliefs about serial murderers, such as the widespread but scientifically dubious "serial killer groupie" label.

While it is possible that violent people may hold some power over others, Ross says, the phenomeon has not been thoroughly studied and is, at best, anecdotal.

"Perhaps we need to shift the lens ... so that we can look at the kinds of relationships people do build with incarcerated men and women," Ross said.

Watch the HuffPost Live interview.

Learn more about Prof. Ross and UB's College of Public Afairs.

 

University of Baltimore

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Criminal Justice Professor Joins New Class of Baltimore Community Fellows

Renita L. Seabrook, assistant professor in the University of Baltimore's School of Criminal Justice in the College of Public Affairs, has been named a 2014 Community Fellow by the Open Society Institute-Baltimore.

OSI-Baltimore launched the Community Fellowship program in 1998. The program looks for dynamic activists and social entrepreneurs who are interested in implementing projects that address problems in underserved communities in Baltimore City.

Seabrook was one of 11 selected to the 2014 class of Community Fellows. The new class of fellows brings the network of engaged leaders focused on effecting social change in Baltimore to 160.

Seabrook, a staunch believer in offender rehabilitation, will receive $60,000 over 18 months to establish Helping Others 2 Win (HO2W), an experiential learning environment that will give pre- and post-release adult female offenders the opportunity to benefit from evidenced-based programming to support their reentry into the community. HO2W will be an extension of Alternative Directions Inc., a Baltimore nonprofit that Seabrook has worked with since 2013 that helps men and women in prison and those leaving prison, become independent, responsible citizens.

"You don't find too many programs geared to women who are in prison, or released from prison, and most programs stereotype gender roles," Seabrook says on OSI's website. "Some women have been beaten down and have lost everything. Many lose their children and relationships; many have themselves experienced trauma or abuse."

Women in the HO2W program will tour a college campus and explore community college opportunities. The program will also focus on developing computer skills, creating a resume and learning how to complete job applications.

Since building self-esteem is particularly important for many of these women, Seabrook plans to have graduate assistants from the University of Baltimore's School of Public and International Affairs mentor the women. The mentoring component will foster respectable relationships between the program’s participants and the graduate assistants. The significance of HO2W aims to bridge the gap by investing in human capital, which allows participants to reach their full potential of success as they reenter in their communities and reunite with families.  

Since its inception, the Baltimore Community Fellowships program has received support from OSI-Baltimore and several other foundations and individuals, including The Clayton Baker Trust, The Lois and Irving Blum Foundation Inc., the Cohen Opportunity Fund, The Marion I. & Henry J. Knott Foundation, the John Meyerhoff and Lenel Srochi Meyerhoff Fund, the Moser Family Philanthropic Fund, The Osprey Foundation, the PNC Foundation, the Alison and Arnold Richman Fund, The Henry and Ruth Blaustein Rosenberg Foundation, Barbara K. and M. Sigmund Shapiro, and numerous individual donors.

This year's group of fellows includes artists, attorneys and community organizers. A six-person committee selected the fellows after extensive evaluation, including peer reviews, site visits and interviews.

Learn more about Prof. Seabrook and UB's College of Public Affairs.

The University of Baltimore is a member of the University System of Maryland and comprises the College of Public Affairs, the Merrick School of Business, the UB School of Law and the Yale Gordon College of Arts and Sciences.

University of Baltimore

News

Student Center Closed: Thanksgiving

The Student Center will be closed on 11/27-11/30 due to the Thanksgiving break. We will resume normal operations on Monday, December 1. 

University of Baltimore

News

Library Closed

University of Baltimore

News

Student Center Closed: Thanksgiving

The Student Center will be closed on 11/27-11/30 due to the Thanksgiving break. We will resume normal operations on Monday, December 1.

University of Baltimore

News

Thanksgiving Break

University of Baltimore

News

Student Center Closed: Thanksgiving

The Student Center will be closed on 11/27-11/30 due to the Thanksgiving break. We will resume normal operations on Monday, December 1.